Olive Willis and Downe House
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Olive Willis and Downe House an adventure in education by Anne Ridler

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Published by Murray in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Willis, Olive, 1877-1964.,
  • Downe House School.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 197-199.

Statement[by] Anne Ridler.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsLF797.D6 R5
The Physical Object
Pagination[7], 205 p.
Number of Pages205
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5591298M
LC Control Number67114398
OCLC/WorldCa2672477

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Olive Willis, founder of Downe House in was determined to create a school where each individual within the community mattered and where relations between staff and pupils should be normal. Her founding principles are very much in evidence a hundred years : Val Horsler. An independent boarding school for girls aged , Downe House is a traditional school with a sharp focus on the future. We fuel aspiration and challenge the girls as they grow into confident young women preparing to play their part in the world. We offer GCSE examinations and A levels and Downe House girls go on to study at universities all. Downe House: A Mystery and a Miracle is a lavishly illustrated book, combining stunning new photography with archive material and providing a fitting celebration for the School's hundredth anniversary. It includes a wonderful selection of intimate memories, anecdotes, stories and reminiscences from current and former pupils, staff, governors and friends. In the house became Downe House, a school for girls run successfully by Miss Olive Willis until , when it moved to larger premises in Cold Ash, Berkshire. Another school opened in its place but failed to emulate Miss Willis’s success, and Down House languished empty for a few years, in an increasing state of disrepair.

In the house became Downe House, a school for girls run by Miss Olive Willis until In the house was bought by Sir George Buckston Brown and work commenced to turn the house into the Darwin on: Luxted Road, Downe, Kent, Downe BR6 7JT, United Kingdom. "A Mystery and a Miracle" will be a lavishly illustrated book, combining stunning new photography with archive material, providing a fitting celebration for the School's hundredth anniversary. It will include a wonderful selection of intimate memories, anecdotes, stories and reminiscences from current and former pupils, staff, governors and friends. There will be contributions from former. Cloisters Spring issue 15 Published on Take a look at the Spring edition of the triannual Foundation e-magazine for the Downe House alumnae community. Life. Anne Bradby was educated at Downe House School and later published a biography of her headmistress, Olive six months in Florence and Rome, she took a diploma in journalism at King's College London.. In , she married Vivian Ridler, the future Printer to Oxford University (–78), but then the manager of the Bunhill Press, London, and they had .

  This wouldn’t surprise the school’s founder, Olive Willis. She wanted Downe House, which she established with a hockey-playing friend, Alice Carver, in , to be different from the boys’ public schools, which were the benchmark for Edwardian education. Olive Willis hosted friends, family, Downe House staff and girls and took great pleasure in seeing them enjoy the quintessential west country atmosphere and landscapes.   Anne Barbara Ridler OBE (née Bradby) (30 July – 15 October ) was an English poet, who worked as an editor for Faber & Faber, Ridler was born Anne Barbara Bradby, the daughter of H.C. Bradby, a housemaster at Rugby School (where she was born). Her mother, Violet (Milford), wrote popular children's stories and was the sister of Humphrey S. Milford, . People, Places, Things – Essays by Elizabeth Bowen Foreword to 'Olive Willis and Downe House', by Anne Ridler Houses: Opening Up the House Home for Christmas He has also edited The Bazaar and Other Stories by Elizabeth Bowen and People, Places, Things: Essays by Elizabeth Bowen, both published by Edinburgh University Press.